MSIPP Opportunities at PNNL

MSIPP Opportunities at PNNL for Undergraduate Students

MSIPP is looking for a high caliber intern to investigate radioactive environments and materials.  This intern will work with leading experts on one of the largest nuclear cleanup efforts in the world. This project will delve into the characteristics of radioactive environments and materials.  This work seeks to help improve our understanding of nuclear waste materials and environments that are ever changing.   The selected student will focus on developing and implementing strategies to understand and determine properties of chemical systems with special emphasis on the material structures and geometries. Research includes laboratory work with the support of mentors, and selected candidate will work with a team of scientists and interns throughout the summer project.

https://careers.pnnl.gov/psc/hrmsx/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=308791&PostingSeq=1

The Hanford site in Richland, WA is home to over 50 million gallons of waste stored in leaking tanks.  An accepted approach for trapping this waste in a stable form is the process of vitrification.  This involves the conversion of waste into a glassy form.  To optimize this process for a resulting glass product that has ideal properties, extensive experimentation should be done to understand how the glass structure and properties are related and how do we control this relationship. Student will assist team of researchers with experimental work including glass processing (preparation of experimental glasses), preparation of chemical batches for heat treatments or melting, and preparation of samples for analysis.   Analysis of samples will include optical microscopy with image analysis, thermal analysis by thermal gravimetric methods, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

https://careers.pnnl.gov/psc/hrmsx/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=308767&PostingSeq=1

This project is focused on the characterization and remediation of contaminated sediments and groundwater.  The selected intern will conduct laboratory research on soil columns to investigate the impact of unsaturated flow on contaminants. The project will test remediation technologies that will be applied to the field. 

https://careers.pnnl.gov/psc/hrmsx/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=308790&PostingSeq=1

Various materials can potentially be used to confine radioactive waste, including glass and cement waste forms. After being fabricated, these waste forms must be stable in a repository environment to ensure that the release of radionuclides and other contaminants are below regulatory requirements.

In this study, the student will aid in the design of a simulant nuclear waste form and design a set of experiments to understand the role of different components on the relative durability of the waste form in an aqueous environment. The student will be exposed to various analytical techniques in the project. These analytical techniques will include both analysis of solutions and solids.

https://careers.pnnl.gov/psc/hrmsx/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=308788&PostingSeq=1

The physical properties research will cover three topics:

  1. Microfluidic bump array support – Conduct and evaluate lab testing of an advanced Mesofluidic Bump array particle separation filter to help establish and confirm mathematical correlations related to gravitational and spacing relationship for purposes of design
  2. Particle pocket angle testing and correlations
  3. Turbulent Settling Models – Test new particle settling models against existing data sets to determine the performance of the combined Turbulent settling Models.

https://careers.pnnl.gov/psc/hrmsx/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=308772&PostingSeq=1

Electron Paramagnetic Spectroscopy (EPR), relies upon placing a sample in an external magnetic field and observing the resonance of unpaired electron spin. This project will develop a new EPR spectroscopic method for non-destructive (NDA) measurements of chemical signatures of nuclear materials intended for use in the field.

The method will rely upon the direct observation of stable paramagnetic trace species resulting from nuclear fission that are also rare in the natural environment. Examples of the EPR active species which can be observed at ambient temperature include Ru3+, Rh4+, Mo5+, Nb4+ and Gd3+.

https://careers.pnnl.gov/psc/hrmsx/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=308769&PostingSeq=1

MSIPP Opportunities at PNNL for Master’s Students

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Earth System Sciences Division is seeking a highly motivated summer intern to participate in research aimed at understanding and controlling the movement of radionuclides in the terrestrial subsurface environment.

The specific objective of this project is to evaluate remedial strategies that can be deployed alone or in combination to stabilize contaminant mixtures in the environment and thus, retard downward flux to groundwater.  Specifically, soil column experiments will be conducted to evaluate

  • the delivery of gaseous carbon substrates through saturated and unsaturated soils,
  • the effectiveness of gaseous substrates to stimulate microbial metabolism in Hanford soils, and
  • the longevity of bio-chemically reduced conditions to immobilize radionuclide mixtures.

The summer intern will work closely with PNNL staff scientists in experimental setup, sample collection, and data analyses. 

https://careers.pnnl.gov/psc/hrmsx/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=308780&PostingSeq=1

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Earth System Sciences Division is seeking a highly motivated summer intern to participate in research aimed at understanding carbon dynamics in the terrestrial subsurface environment.  Through detailed characterization of subsurface carbon chemistry, we aim to better understand the coordinated processes that control the supply of carbon ligands (reactivity, functionality) that are available for complexation with long-lived radio-contaminants (e.g., iodine) at the Hanford Site, and potentially alter contaminant mobility in the subsurface and across the terrestrial subsurface-aquatic interface.

Briefly, total organic carbon will be extracted from representative soils from a depth of 70 feet down to 250 feet. Organic carbon pools will be size fractionated and quantified.  Biomolecular characterization of the dissolved organic carbon fractions will be performed by high-resolution mass spectrometry in collaboration with researchers at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL).

The summer intern will work closely with PNNL staff scientists in experimental setup, sample collection, and data analyses. 

 https://careers.pnnl.gov/psc/hrmsx/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=308777&PostingSeq=1

The Hanford site in Richland, WA is home to over 50 million gallons of waste stored in leaking tanks.  An accepted approach for trapping this waste in a stable form is the process of vitrification.  This involves the conversion of waste into a glassy form.  To optimize this process for a resulting glass product that has ideal properties, extensive experimentation should be done to understand how the glass structure and properties are related and how do we control this relationship.

Student will assist team of researchers with experimental work including glass processing (preparation of experimental glasses), preparation of chemical batches for heat treatments or melting, and preparation of samples for analysis.   Analysis of samples will include optical microscopy with image analysis, thermal analysis by thermal gravimetric methods, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

Presentation of experimental work and data to staff at meetings is required.  Student(s) are encouraged to follow up research with a publication.

https://careers.pnnl.gov/psc/hrmsx/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=308768&PostingSeq=1

The laboratory-based research involves experiments conducted to evaluate the processes that control the release and mobility of contaminants and their interactions with minerals, soils and sediments.  The student will conduct research to determine the extent and rate of adsorption/desorption reactions, study the fate and transport of contaminants (e.g., U, Tc, Cr and I), and investigate changes in the chemical, mineralogical and physical properties of soils/sediments at different temporal and spatial scales. The student will be setting up and running batch and/or hydraulically saturated and unsaturated column experiments in support of these efforts. If time allows, the student will also process this data into meaningful graphs and tables. The student will be required to follow strict quality control requirements, and use equipment including pipettes, balances, pH meters, and other standard laboratory equipment.

https://careers.pnnl.gov/psc/hrmsx/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=308782&PostingSeq=1

The physical properties research will cover three topics:

  1. Microfluidic bump array support – Conduct and evaluate lab testing of an advanced Mesofluidic Bump array particle separation filter to help establish and confirm mathematical correlations related to gravitational and spacing relationship for purposes of design.
  2. Particle pocket angle testing and correlations.
  3. Turbulent settling Models – Test new particle settling models against existing data sets to determine the performance of the combined Turbulent Settling Models.

https://careers.pnnl.gov/psc/hrmsx/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=308771&PostingSeq=1

Various materials can potentially be used to confine radioactive waste, including glass and cement waste forms. After being fabricated, these waste forms must be stable in a repository environment to ensure that the release of radionuclides and other contaminants are below regulatory requirements.

In this study, the student will aid in the design of a simulant nuclear waste form and design a set of experiments to understand the role of different components on the relative durability of the waste form in an aqueous environment. The student will be exposed to various analytical techniques in the project. These analytical techniques will include both analysis of solutions and solids.

https://careers.pnnl.gov/psc/hrmsx/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM_FL.HRS_CG_SEARCH_FL.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST_FL&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1&JobOpeningId=308789&PostingSeq=1

 

 


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